riddick09:

Mobile Truck Tiny House

I don’t feel I missed anything beyond this form of life. Yes, I gave up a lot of stuff-books, clothing and other unnecessary things we all registers. But gained freedom. Real freedom. Freedom of movement, that allows me to live near the beach, in the beautiful wooded area, or even in the city. Freedom from taxes, electricity, cable companies and corporations.

cosmeticevolution:

So gorgeous!

cosmeticevolution:

So gorgeous!

tinyhouseamerica:

The Minim House

This is the Minim House, a 235 square foot cottage designed by Foundry Architects and Minim Homes. The tiny house is efficient in every sens of the word. It has a tiny floor plan which makes great use of space and has an organized and space-saving design. The exterior of the house is modern and simple, very sleek and with no overhangs. The hidden rain gutters are integrated into the roof. The interior is modern, simple and inviting.{found on smallhousebliss}

helloleapea:

Another great house blog

helloleapea:

Another great house blog

thetroublewithbees:

This is the trouble with bees. They inspire you to quit your office job that required seven years of schooling. Then you haul them in your new truck halfway across the country to live on an organic mountain farm. There you learn how to grow food sustainably and without harming life — including the bees, those tiny, beautiful creatures that play matchmaker to the flowers, sweeten our tongues, brighten our nights with candlelight, and heal our wounds.
Honey bees are dying at alarming rates, risking the diversity of our food supply. Can you imagine a world with no apples, coffee, almonds, cherries, watermelons, avocados, mangoes, limes, and more than 100 other crops? Scientists are still not entirely sure what is causing the mass bee deaths, but pesticides — primarily a new class of chemicals called neonicotinoids — are at the top of the list. Their survival is also threatened by genetically engineered crops, the practice of growing a single crop on an extensive area of land called monoculture, and the use of chemicals in bee hives. But bees are not the only ones at risk — their troubles are our troubles too. Honey bees are our modern-day canaries in the coal mine, signaling a crisis in our industrial food system. The harsh reality is, the agricultural practices we rely on to sustain us may also be destroying us. Sound like enough trouble for you?

thetroublewithbees:

This is the trouble with bees. They inspire you to quit your office job that required seven years of schooling. Then you haul them in your new truck halfway across the country to live on an organic mountain farm. There you learn how to grow food sustainably and without harming life — including the bees, those tiny, beautiful creatures that play matchmaker to the flowers, sweeten our tongues, brighten our nights with candlelight, and heal our wounds.

Honey bees are dying at alarming rates, risking the diversity of our food supply. Can you imagine a world with no apples, coffee, almonds, cherries, watermelons, avocados, mangoes, limes, and more than 100 other crops? Scientists are still not entirely sure what is causing the mass bee deaths, but pesticides — primarily a new class of chemicals called neonicotinoids — are at the top of the list. Their survival is also threatened by genetically engineered crops, the practice of growing a single crop on an extensive area of land called monoculture, and the use of chemicals in bee hives. But bees are not the only ones at risk — their troubles are our troubles too. Honey bees are our modern-day canaries in the coal mine, signaling a crisis in our industrial food system. The harsh reality is, the agricultural practices we rely on to sustain us may also be destroying us. Sound like enough trouble for you?

Spooky bug in my Nana’s lavender blooms. #nature #coolbugs

Spooky bug in my Nana’s lavender blooms. #nature #coolbugs